The Fire Ceremony II: Metamorphosis selected for the 7th Annual NYC Independent Film Festival

laurel_Official_selection

My film The Fire Ceremony II: Metamorphosis, soundtrack When I Die feat. michael dent (Youth “Don’t Feed the Trolls Rainbow mix”) by Jeremy Gluck and Michael Dent, remixed L. MacLean. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 International License, has been selected for the 7th Annual NYC Independent Film Festival running from April 27 to May 1, 2016 in New York City. For more information, click here.

It will be screened twice: Art/Experimental Session April 28, 2016 9:00 pm Producers Club – Studio 3 · 358 West 44th Street · New York, NY 10036 & Art/Experimental Films Sessions 4 April 30, 2016 12:00 pm Producers Club – Theater P · 358 West 44th Street New York, NY 10036. See the trailer below.

This film also won the Best Technical Achievement award at the Burnaby Film Forum in Sept. 2015.

NYC Independent Film Festival 2016 Program excerpt

Read my blog post about our trip to NYC for the Festival here.

Selfies vs Self-Portraits: Expanding the Genre at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria

Double Self-Portrait in a Burning Room 10

In conjunction with the exhibition The Artist Herself: Self-Portraits by Canadian Historical Women Artists running from Oct 2, 2015 to Jan 3, 2016 at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, the gallery organised a parallel show entitled Selfies vs Self-Portraits: Expanding the Genre. The premise of the selfie exhibition was articulated as follows: “We want you to think about more than just your face representing the self. Taking inspiration from the artists featured in the exhibition, we are looking for images that explore the definition of the self-portrait and representations of identity. Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to redefine the genre by looking at the spaces you occupy, the things you create, the objects that surround and/or adorn you; all the things that create the likeness of you as an individual”. 

Double Self-Portrait in a Burning Room

I was happy to have two of my Double Self-Portrait in a Burning Room works included. For more info on the Historical Portraiture show, click here. For more on the Selfie exhibit, click here.

See a video about portraiture, with some shots of the works included in the show, below.

 

Midnight Sun Art & Film Festival, Sun Peaks, BC

We had an excellent time at the Midnight Sun Art and Film Festival in Sun Peaks, BC, about 45 km north of Kamloops, from August 7 – 9, for the outdoor screening of my video The Fire Ceremony II: Metamorphosis, an experimental short which opened the festival.

See the Festival program Midnight Sun Art & Film Festival and my photos here.

New Video Work

Update: My film The Fire Ceremony II: Metamorphosis, soundtrack When I Die feat. michael dent (Youth “Don’t Feed the Trolls Rainbow mix”) by Jeremy Gluck and Michael Dent, remixed L. MacLean. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 International License, has been selected for the 7th Annual NYC Independent Film Festival running from April 27 to May 1, 2016 in New York City. For more information, click here.

It was screened twice: Art/Experimental Session April 28, 2016 9:00 pm Producers Club – Studio 3 · 358 West 44th Street · New York, NY 10036 & Art/Experimental Films Sessions 4 April 30, 2016 12:00 pm Producers Club – Theater P · 358 West 44th Street New York, NY 10036.

This film was also screened at the Burnaby Film Forum in September 2015 where it won the Best Technical Achievement Award and was featured at the Midnight Sun Art Festival in Sun Peaks, British Columbia, Canada running Aug 7-9, 2015. It was also screened at the LACDA 11 Year Anniversary Represented Artists Exhibit from April 9 – May 14, 2015.

The Fire Ceremony II: Metamorphosis. Mixed media installations, projections, performance and video 2014-15.

The Fire Ceremony II: Metamorphosis represents an unfolding metamorphosis of elements that are transmuted through fire and water, from ancient ruins to an unknown future. As the ceremony proceeds a sequence of projections bathes the proceedings in a kaleidoscope of changing images and colours, all ultimately dissolved in fiery conflagrations. Beginning with a step through a flaming basement door into a ruined cathedral in central Anatolia, the visual narrative carries us through abandoned ruins and landscapes, to a Spring Solstice ritual burning for Nevruz, the Turkish and Persian New Year, to an idiosyncratic fire ceremony performed by an apprentice yogini, to an imagined post-apocalyptic west coast of British Columbia.

Requiem: Birds and Beasts: Mixed media installations, projections and video 2015. No soundtrack.

This work comprises digital images of a sculptural tableau of natural and pseudo-natural elements (a dead magnolia branch picked up during a bike ride, candles, LED lights, plastic flowers from a Mexican market), and photographic projections of animal specimens. I had the pleasure of access to the teaching collection of animal specimens at the Beaty Biodiversity Museum at UBC where I was able to examine their shelves and drawers of bird, mammal, and insect species. It was fascinating and also somewhat sad to gently handle and photograph their bodies; I was amazed to note how similar some of the small mammals and birds were to humans as they lay in their silent sleep.

Laura Reznek CD Release Show at Renegade Studios, Vancouver

I was delighted to be asked to provide projections for the Laura Reznek ‘Who Came Before Us’ CD Release Show at Renegade Studios in Vancouver. Laura is a local up-and-coming singer/songwriter whose piano stylings and smoky vocals captivate. She and her band entertained the crowd in front of a screen on which my photographic projections provided a visual counterpoint to the musical proceedings. Along with Laura on piano are Hayato Kubo on drums, Mark Brown on bass, Samuel Romero on guitar, with Jocelyn Hallett & Bronwyn Malloy on backup vocals.

Awesome fun! For more information on Laura, click here.

Click here for a video clip of the event.

Dancing in front of Queen Anne’s Lace

Dancing in front of Queen Anne's Lace, detail

Last night, in front of the Queen Anne’s Lace piece I hung up the two large photographs bound for Cracow in a few days. I had originally intended to hang these from a clothesline in either the ruined house at the top of the hill or, possibly, one of the ruined windmills. However, when I was downstairs in the studio in the morning unpacking my tube, I noticed the two trees standing just outside with the town panorama in the background and thought that it might work to install them there. I put up the string but when I tried to affix one of the prints, the wind was just too strong; rather than ripple gently in the breeze, the print was swung violently up in the air so I decided against it. Instead, I grabbed two more wooden easels, set them up on either side of the still life, and hung the two photographs from the line strung between them. I was interested in seeing how they would look in the candlelight. I also decided that I would perform some calisthenics in front of them to see what these movements would look like captured on film. I liked the shadows created by the movements of my arms, legs and hair and the way that my moving body became translucent when photographed in front of the still objects, all except my feet.

See pictures here.

Large format printing in Turgutreis

Large format printing

Saturday – market day in Turgutreis. After breakfast with Seray, I grabbed my bike and rode up the hill towards the gumbet – disused cistern – at the top of the hill and took the opportunity to take a few pictures of my little Styrofoam lily pad koreks, still floating around on the water along with the discarded pop and water bottles and other assorted junk. Whitewashed the last time I’d seen it, between now and then the cistern has been spray painted with graffiti once again. I rode up and over the hill behind the Academy, pausing briefly at the top to take a few pictures of the ten day vacation homes, so named because they’re owned by foreigners who only use them ten days a year. Other than that, they stand vacant.

Earlier this week, I received an email from the President of the Cracow International Print Triennial informing me that my works had qualified to the Phase 2 of selection of the International Print Triennial Krakow 2009. The deadline for submission is June 15 – not very far away – and so I needed to get my work printed so it can be sent off tout suite. Asking around the market area for large format printing, a restaurateur took me to a tiny stationery and art supplies shop which, lo and behold, had a large format printer. Amazingly, I had my flash drive in my purse with two of the images on it (this without any planning at all on my part) – what are the chances of that, I thought to myself. Anyway, I watched and waited as the guy and his helper printed out my pictures in between helping what seemed like a million people with photocopy jobs. With my two rolled prints in hand, I then hunted around for a big plastic tube, finally finding one at a hardware store. I inserted the prints into the tube, taped up the ends with plastic and strapped the whole thing to my bike’s crossbar with two luggage straps bought at the dollar store. Because the tube is quite big around, it was difficult to ride since my left knee was pointed out at an awkward angle. Anyway, I managed to make my way out of town back along the main road and decided to stop at the Kadikalesi beach for a break. After enjoying some time at the Kekik Beach Bar in Kadikalesi, I rearranged my tube on my handlebars and pedaled back along the main drag.

See a few pictures here.

Queen Anne’s Lace

Yesterday, I hopped on my bike, intending to retrieve my korek from the beach. When I got down there, though, I saw immediately that someone else had removed them for me – they were nowhere to be seen. Perhaps someone took a fancy to them and carried them off home – I hope so, rather that than have them end up in the garbage or burned. I stopped for a beer and a mixed toast at the Club Gumusluk restaurant and bar on the beach and shared my sausage and cheese sandwich with a pregnant cat who had a tiny triangular face and a largish belly. I am a sucker for Turkish cats. On the way back, I acquired more korek stalks from the hillside to replace those lost and some stalks of Queen Anne’s lace with which I will compose a still life assemblage later.

Over the past few days I have painted ten thin banners of translucent tracing paper in different colours to more or less match my painted korek stalks. I was thinking about hanging them up in a tetractys configuration behind an installation of korek, and then later making them into lamp shades to put around my tea light candles. I installed them in the studio on three pieces of string stretched between two easels, on either side of a still life of Queen Anne’s lace, two hands, a silver tea pot, korek heads and candles on the wooden table. On the floor in front of the table I placed the final two banners on either side of a pedestal with a still life of red and pink sardunya and jasmine flowers; on these banners I placed 6 glasses with silver korek heads resting in water and 6 small candles. I enjoyed the shadows cast by the plants on the wall and ceiling of the studio; these shadows moved and changed as the candles flickered and the water in the glasses trembled.

See pictures here.

Korek again

Korek on the beach

After having suspended the korek from a clothesline near the pond, the next day I placed them in the trees around one of Eyip’s figurative sculptures near the entrance to the Academy. I enjoyed seeing their bright colours against the pearly whiteness of the sculpture and also the shadows of the stalks as they fell across the figure. Since the ground around the Academy is rock-hard and pretty much impossible to dig into, I had decided last night that I would install the korek on the beach somehow, since the sand would be easier to work with. I gathered up my 6 smaller korek stalks, put them in a large blue garbage bag, hung my mannequin-hand bag over my handlebars, jumped on my bike and headed down to Gumusluk beach.

I first set up my small assemblage on the base of the abstracted figurative sculpture in the middle of the beach next to the cemented-over house. Then, spying two nice feathery trees in the sand a few meters away, I decided to move them there. I hung the red and gold tablecloth from one of the trees with string, then planted the six korek stalks and the two hands holding crepe paper ribbons in the sand around that tree. It was very windy and the ribbons blew briskly in the breeze. Seeing the coloured stalks standing around the slim white-painted tree trunk amused me and I lay on the sand for a while next to it. The sun was very warm and I watched two wind surfers struggle with the wind and try to zip across the bay on their boards. Since it was really too windy to try to ride back with my big bag of korek flapping into the bike tires, I simply left them planted there on the beach.

See pictures here and here.